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Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum

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Published Date Aug 4, 2006
Pages 228
PDF Fact Sheet View Fact Sheet for the report Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum in PDF
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Publisher BioSeeker Group

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Quick Overview

The immunotherapy field in cancer has never been more potent than it is right now, including block buster drugs like Avastin, Erbitux, and Rituxan. Antibodies are making the headlines but cancer vaccines are not far away. The recent approval of Gardasil, a cervical cancer vaccine, will certainly become a strong representative of its kind. Future challenges for the industry lie in discovering strong antigens, effective immunomodulators and developing suitable delivery technologies.

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Introduction

The immunotherapy field in cancer has never been more potent than it is right now, including block buster drugs like Avastin, Erbitux, and Rituxan. Antibodies are making the headlines but cancer vaccines are not far away. The recent approval of Gardasil, a cervical cancer vaccine, will certainly become a strong representative of its kind. Future challenges for the industry lie in discovering strong antigens, effective immunomodulators and developing suitable delivery technologies.

Scope of this report

  • In-depth competitive landscape assessment of the cancer immunotherapy market place; Including more than 200 immunotherapy drugs and pharmaceutical companies
  • Thorough review of tumor antigen discovery, immunomodulating strategies and adjuvants
  • Thorough review of antibody and vaccine delivery and technologies surrounding it – The next generation
  • Progress analysis of six major cancer vaccine indications and late stage antibody development projects, including players, drugs, clinical progress and pitfalls

Research and analysis highlights

Among the targeted therapies for cancer, immunotherapy is probably the most versatile treatment strategy for the eradication of tumors, metastatic spread or not. Main strategies of cancer immunotherapy aim at exploiting the therapeutic potential of tumor-specific antibodies and cellular immune effector mechanisms (vaccines). Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of a tumor-specific immune response combining both humoral and cytotoxic T cell effector mechanisms by the host’s immune system, is advancing over passive antibody therapy, which relies on the repeated application of large quantities of tumor antigen-specific antibodies.

Key reasons to read this report

  • Understand the clinical and strategic challenges to the commercialization of immunotherapy drugs
  • Assess opportunities and risks for the continued development of both cancer antibodies and vaccines in different cancer indications.
  • Adopt knowledge from this analysis to drive strategic planning decisions in oncology drug development

1 Executive Summary


2 Methodology


3 3.1 List of Boxes
3.2 List of Figures
3.3 List of Tables


4 Vaccine Strategies: Challenges & Opportunities


5 Key Antibody Developmental Strategies


6 Competitive Landscape in Cancer Vaccines
6.1 Countries & Players: Who are In the Lead?
6.1.1 Top 10 Players Constitute Up to One Third of R&D: Big Pharma Not Included!
6.1.2 Approved Cancer Vaccine Drugs: Performance
6.2 Deals & Alliances in Cancer Vaccines
6.2.1 Recent Mergers & Acquisitions in Cancer Vaccines
6.2.2 Deals in Prostate Cancer
6.2.3 Deals in Breast Cancer
6.2.4 Deals in Leukemia & Lymphoma
6.2.5 Drug Delivery Deals in Cancer Vaccines
6.2.6 Adjuvant Deals


7 Antibody Deals on the Rise
7.1 Antibody Deals in Phase III
7.1.1 Deal Situation: MDX 010
7.1.2 Deal Situation: WX G250
7.1.3 Deal Situation: Zanolimumab
7.2 Antibody Deals in Phase II
7.2.1 Deal Situation: Mapatumumab
7.2.2 Deal Situation: GCR 3888
7.2.3 Deal Situation: MDX 070
7.2.4 Deal Situation: CDP 860
7.2.5 Deal Situation: Tru-Scint OV
7.2.6 Deal Situation: SC 1
7.2.7 Deal Situation: PRO 70769
7.2.8 Deal Situation: XR 303
7.2.9 Deal Situation: HumaRAD-HN


8 Tumor Antigens
8.1 Tumor Antigens: General Comments
8.2 Antigen Discovery
8.2.1 Classical Immunology Approach
8.2.2 The Reverse Immunology Approach
8.2.3 Company Platforms
8.2.3.1 Epitope Identification System - EIS®
8.2.3.2 EPIQUEST system
8.2.3.3 MolecularBreeding™ & MaxyScan™
8.2.3.4 ProtEx™ technology
8.2.3.5 Rapid Identification of Alternative Splicing (RIAS) System
8.2.3.6 SMARTOMICS™
8.3 Specific Antigen Processing Technologies Increasing Antigen Presentation


9 Immunomodulators & Adjuvants in Cancer Vaccines
9.1 Overview
9.2 Cytokines
9.2.1 Vaccines in Combination with Interleukin-2
9.2.2 Tumor Necrosis Factor
9.2.3 Interferons
9.3 Adjuvants
9.4 Other Immunomodulating Strategies
9.4.1 An Immune Response Modifying Protein
9.4.2 Immunostimulatory DNA
9.4.3 Ex Vivo Stimulated Immune Cells
9.4.4 Fusion Protein Gain Potent Immune Response
9.4.5 Macrophage and Natural Killer Cells Activation
9.4.6 Selective Suppression of the Immune System to An Antigen
9.4.7 TAP Technology


10 Cancer Vaccine Delivery
10.1 Viral Delivery
10.1.1 Introduction
10.1.2 Viral Constructs Put into Use
10.1.2.1 Replicon-based RNA and DNA vaccines
10.1.2.1.1 The Alphavaccine Platform System - ArV™
10.1.2.1.2 MVA-BN
10.1.2.2 Retroviruses
10.1.2.2.1 The SDSV-platform
10.1.2.3 Lentivirus
10.1.2.3.1 LentiPak™
10.1.2.3.2 LentiVector™/ pEGASUS™
10.1.2.4 Adenoviruses
10.1.2.4.1 Failed Adenovirus Delivery Platforms
10.1.2.4.2 GVAX
10.1.2.4.3 TNFerade™
10.1.2.4.4 INGN-225
10.1.2.5 Adeno-associated viruses
10.1.2.5.1 Failed AAV Delivery Platforms
10.1.2.5.2 Genzyme Acquires AAV vector Technology
10.1.2.5.3 MediGene’s AAV Platform
10.1.2.6 Herpes Simplex Viruses
10.1.2.6.1 DISC-HSV
10.1.2.6.2 ImmunoVEX
10.1.2.7 Poxviruses
10.1.2.7.1 Hi-8™ PrimeBoost™ platform
10.1.2.7.2 PROSTVAC-VF
10.1.2.7.3 Transgene’s MVA Platform
10.1.2.7.4 TroVax
10.1.2.8 Other Poxvirus Systems
10.1.2.9 Baculovirus
10.1.2.9.1 Chimeric virus -like particles (CVLPs)
10.2 Bacterias
10.3 Cell Therapy: Dendritic-cell Based & Cancer-Cell Based Therapies
10.3.1 Introduction
10.3.2 Cell Therapy Strategies
10.3.2.1 Processed Tumor Cells
10.3.2.2 Lysed Tumor Cell Line
10.3.2.3 The Dendritic Cell Strategy that Didn’t Work Out
10.3.2.4 HSPs
10.3.2.5 Provenge™
10.3.2.6 Dendritophages
10.3.2.7 Cell-targeting Antibodies
10.3.2.8 Increase Dendritic Cell Number
10.3.2.9 DCVax®
10.3.2.10 ACTIVATE™
10.4 Synthetic Delivery Systems & Strategies
10.4.1 Introduction
10.4.2 Biotransport™
10.4.3 Biotype®vector
10.4.4 DNAVax Gene Delivery System
10.4.5 FusitAb™
10.4.6 GeneDrug™
10.4.7 Molecular Conjugates
10.4.8 Naked DNA Delivery
10.4.9 PVLP Technology
10.4.10 Sphingosomal Drug Delivery Technology
10.4.11 STEALTH
10.4.12 Failed Liposomal Systems


11 New Approaches in Antibody Delivery and Design - The Next Generation
11.1 How to Make Them Smaller and Different?
11.2 Biomaterials in Sustained Delivery Applications
11.2.1 Implants
11.3 Gene delivery - the Future?
11.3.1 Delivery Vehicles for DNA
11.3.2 Gene Delivery in Commercialization


12 Cancer Vaccines in Development: By Major Indications
12.1 General Oncology Overview
12.2 Progress Analysis - Melanoma
12.3 Progress Analysis - Breast Cancer
12.4 Progress Analysis - Prostate Cancer
12.5 Progress Analysis - Lung Cancer
12.6 Progress Analysis - Colorectal Cancer
12.7 Progress Analysis - Cervical Cancer


13 Antibodies in Clinical Development
13.1.1 Prostate Cancer Therapeutics
13.1.2 Breast Cancer Therapeutics
13.1.3 Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics
13.1.4 Melanoma Therapeutics
13.1.5 Hematological Cancers Therapeutics
13.2 Antibodies in Phase III Clinical Development
13.2.1 Progress Analysis: IGN 101
13.2.1.1 Breast Cancer
13.2.1.2 Lung Cancer
13.2.1.3 Colorectal cancer
13.2.2 Progress Analysis: MDX 010
13.2.2.1 Melanoma
13.2.2.2 Breast Cancer
13.2.2.3 Prostate Cancer
13.2.2.4 Kidney Cancer
13.2.3 Progress Analysis: ONYVAX 105
13.2.3.1 Colorectal cancer
13.2.3.2 Other Indications
13.2.4 Progress Analysis: Ovarex
13.2.4.1 Ovarian cancer
13.2.5 Progress Analysis: Panitumumab
13.2.5.1 Solid tumors
13.2.5.2 Colorectal cancer
13.2.5.3 Lung Cancer
13.2.5.4 Kidney Cancer
13.2.6 Progress Analysis: RENCAREX
13.2.6.1 Kidney Cancer
13.2.7 Progress Analysis: Nimotuzumab
13.2.7.1 Brain cancer
13.2.7.2 Pancreatic cancer
13.2.7.3 Head and neck cancer
13.2.7.4 Lung Cancer
13.2.8 Progress Analysis: TransMID
13.2.8.1 Brain Cancer
13.2.9 Progress Analysis: Lintuzumab
13.2.9.1 Leukemia
13.2.10 Progress Analysis: Zanolimumab
13.2.10.1 Lymphoma
13.3 Antibodies in Phase II Clinical Development
13.3.1 Progress Analysis: ABT-510
13.3.1.1 Kidney Cancer
13.3.1.2 Soft Tissue Sarcoma
13.3.1.3 Lung Cancer
13.3.2 Progress Analysis: BB 10901
13.3.2.1 Lung Cancer
13.3.2.2 Multiple Myeloma
13.3.3 Progress Analysis: CP 675206
13.3.3.1 Melanoma
13.3.4 Progress Analysis: CNTO-328
13.3.4.1 Kidney Cancer
13.3.4.2 Multiple Myeloma
13.3.4.3 Prostate cancer
13.3.5 Progress Analysis: Ecromeximab
13.3.5.1 Melanoma
13.3.6 Progress Analysis: EMD 273063
13.3.6.1 Melanoma
13.3.7 Progress Analysis: WX-G250RIT
13.3.7.1 Billary Cancer
13.3.7.2 Kidney Cancer
13.3.8 Progress Analysis: HGS-ETR1
13.3.8.1 Lung Cancer
13.3.8.2 Lymphoma
13.3.8.3 Colorectal Cancer
13.3.8.4 HGS-ETR2
13.3.9 Progress Analysis: HuMax-CD20
13.3.9.1 Lymphoma
13.3.10 Progress Analysis: HuMax-EGFr
13.3.10.1 Head and Neck Cancer
13.3.11 Progress Analysis: Galiximab
13.3.11.1 Lymphoma
13.3.12 Progress Analysis: PROXINIUM
13.3.12.1 Head and Neck Cancer
13.3.12.2 Bladder Cancer
13.3.13 Progress Analysis: RAV12
13.3.13.1 Colorectal Cancer
13.3.14 Progress Analysis: SGN-15
13.3.14.1 Lung Cancer
13.3.14.2 Prostate Cancer
13.3.14.3 Metastatic Breast and Colorectal Cancer
13.3.15 Progress Analysis: SGN-30
13.3.15.1 Lymphoma
13.3.16 Progression Analysis: VEGF-Trap
13.3.16.1 Solid Tumors
13.3.17 Progress Analysis: MEDI 522
13.3.17.1 Colorectal Cancer
13.3.17.2 Melanoma
13.3.18 Progress Analysis: Volociximab
13.3.18.1 Kidney Cancer


14 Disclaimer
14.1 Liability
14.2 Completeness


15 Drug Index


16 Company Index


3.1 List of Boxes
Box 1: Mechanisms Which Tumor Cells Use to Evade an Immune Reaction
Box 2: M-VAX - Business & Market Bakground
Box 3: Gardasil: Business & Market Background
Box 4: The Principal Terms of Deal between AstraZeneca and Cambridge Antibody Technology
Box 5: TNF in Cancer Treatments
Box 6: Marrion’s Drug Delivery Technology
Box 9: Quick Facts - IGN 101
Box 11: Quick Facts - MDX 010
Box 12: Quick Facts - ONYVAX 105
Box 13: Quick Facts - Ovarex
Box 14: Quick Facts - Panitumumab
Box 15: Quick Facts - RENCARNEX
Box 16: Quick Facts - Nimotuzumab
Box 17: Quick Facts - RENCARNEX
Box 18: Quick Facts - Lintuzumab
Box 19: Quick Facts - Zanolimumab
Box 20: Quick Facts - ABT-510
Box 21: Quick Facts - BB 10901
Box 22: Quick Facts - CP-675206
Box 23: Quick Facts - CNTO-328
Box 24: Quick Facts - Ecromeximab
Box 25: Quick Facts - EMD-273063
Box 26: Quick Facts - WX-G250RIT
Box 27: Quick Facts - HGS-ETR1
Box 28: Quick Facts - HuMax-CD20
Box 29: Quick Facts - HuMax-EGFr
Box 30: Quick Facts - Galiximab
Box 31: Quick Facts - PROXINIUM
Box 32: Quick Facts - RAV12
Box 33: Quick Facts -SGN-15
Box 34: Quick Facts -SGN-30
Box 35: Quick Facts - VEGF-Trap
Box 36: Quick Facts - MEDI 522
Box 37: Quick Facts - Volociximab


3.2 List of Figures
Figure 1: Top 10 Countries in Cancer Vaccine Research
Figure 2: Top 10 Companies’ Clinical Trial Progress in Cancer Vaccine
Figure 3: 2003-2005 Deals & Alliances in Cancer Vaccine
Figure 4: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Melanoma
Figure 5: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Breast Cancer
Figure 6: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Prostate Cancer
Figure 7: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Lung Cancer
Figure 8: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Colorectal Cancer
Figure 9: Distribution of Cancer Vaccine Trials in Cervical Cancer


3.3 List of Tables
Table 1: Summary of Strategies Enhancing Antibody Function
Table 2: Companies with Cancer Vaccine Drugs on Market
Table 3: Antigen Classification
Table 4: Platforms Used to Improve Antigen Presentation
Table 5: Cancer Vaccines in Clinical Trials in Combination with Interleukin-2
Table 6: Adjuvants in Cancer Vaccines
Table 7: Synthetic Delivery Systems Deployed in Cancer in General and Cancer Vaccines in Particular
Table 8: Potential Advantages in Local, Controlled-Release for Therapeutic Antibodies
Table 9: Drug Delivery Companies with Cancer Focus
Table 10: FDA Approved Polymer-based Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer
Table 11 Top 10 Cancer Indications in Non-Antibody Based Cancer Vaccines
Table 12: Discountinued Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccine Drugs
Table 13: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Melanoma
Table 14: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Breast Cancer
Table 15: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Prostate Cancer
Table 16: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Lung Cancer
Table 17: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Colorectal Cancer
Table 18: List of Phase I to Phase III Cancer Vaccines in Development for Cervical Cancer
Table 19: Antibody Therapeutics in Prostate Cancer
Table 20: Antibody Therapeutics in Breast Cancer
Table 21: Antibody Therapeutics in Colorectal Cancer
Table 22: Antibody Therapeutics in Melanoma
Table 23: Antibody Therapeutics in Hematological Cancer
Table 24: MDX-010’s Collaborative History and Landscape

Request Sample Pages or Access via 1stOncology™

  • You can request Free Sample Pages to Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum.
    To find out more about Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum, please read the product description below.
    We also are happy to email you out free sample pages which contain screen shots and more information on the methodology behind the product.

    Did you know that Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum is part of the 1stOncology™ platform and can be accessed at no extra cost?

    1stOncology™ allows you to always stay on top of what is really going on in the world of cancer drug development and have an edge when it comes to Search & Evaluation, Indication Selection & Expansion, Target Scouting, First-in-Class analysis and much, much more.


    Or

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Immunotherapy in Oncology: Gaining Momentum
The immunotherapy field in cancer has never been more potent than it is right now, including block buster drugs like Avastin, Erbitux, and Rituxan. Antibodies are making the headlines but cancer vaccines are not far away. The recent approval of Gardasil, a cervical cancer vaccine, will certainly become a strong representative of its kind. Future challenges for the industry lie in discovering strong antigens, effective immunomodulators and developing suitable delivery technologies. Learn More