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Decoding Big Pharmas R&D Strategy in Oncology

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Published Date Sep 14, 2007
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Quick Overview

This report, Decoding Big Pharma’s R&D Strategy in Oncology, is based on five major pharmaceutical companies in the oncology arena: Bristol-Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Sanofi-Aventis.

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Introduction

This report, Decoding Big Pharma’s R&D Strategy in Oncology, is based on five major pharmaceutical companies in the oncology arena: Bristol-Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Sanofi-Aventis. Between them and together with their respective partners they have more than 250 drugs for the treatment of cancer. In other words, their collective R&D capacity and presence is solid enough to set trends for the entire field of oncology drug development. Beyond trends, all five are fiercely defining their competitive edge and advantage in oncology and that is what this report is about.
BioSeeker has in this very insightful publication focused on Deals and alliances, Drug targets, Compound types, Targeted therapy areas, and Selection of cancer indications among the five included big pharma companies. The collective force of the above research and analysis ’decodes’ these five big pharma R&D efforts into strategy revealing and gap filing presentations. Enough to fuel and sustain comparative benchmarking, peer group surveillance, and partnership decisions.

Decoding Big Pharma’s R&D Strategy in Oncology in numbers:

  • Includes references to more than 250 drugs and 600 clinical/preclinical trials
  • Addresses the competitive situation on more than 80 different cancer indications, including supportive care indications
  • Special focus on Angiogenesis-, Antibody-, Apoptosis-, Protein kinase inhibitor- and Vaccine drugs for the treatment of cancer
  • The included competitive landscape between the five big pharma includes more than 200 companies related to cancer drug development
  • Last five years of deals and alliances in oncology, including almost a hundred different key deals and alliances
  • Target analysis of 119 drug targets in oncology, including molecular function of target, target localization, type of compound for targeting, targets affecting signaling pathways etc
  • Drug compound analysis by cancer indications

 

1 Executive Summary
2 About Cancer Highlights
3 Methodologies
4 Table of Contents
4.1 List of Tables
5 Big Pharma’s R&D Position and Strategy in Oncology: A Summary
5.1 Bristol-Myers Squibb
5.2 GlaxoSmithKline
5.3 Hoffmann-La Roche
5.4 Novartis
5.5 Sanofi-Aventis
6 Last Five Years of Deals and Alliances in Oncology
6.1 Bristol Myers Squibb
6.1.1 Discovery and Lead Molecule Improvements
6.1.2 Adding Image Analysis to Support Clinical Trials and Early Diagnosis
6.1.3 Bladder Cancer and Melanoma Registration Filings are Emminent
6.1.4 The Human Kinome and Cell Cycle Inhibitors
6.1.5 Strategic Priorities in Pipeline Development Leads to Divestments
6.1.6 Erbitux Expansion is Set to Challenge Avastin
6.2 GlaxoSmithKline 44
6.2.1 The Biopharmaceutical Strategy at GSK
6.2.2 Out Goes Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors
6.2.3 Marketing and Manufacturing Collaborations
6.2.4 Patient Selectionfo r GSK’s Targeted Cancer Therapies
6.2.5 GSK Taping Into Knowledge Databases
6.2.6 Increasing the Oral Bioavailability Cytotoxic Oncology Drugs
6.2.7 Oxford University Helps GSK in India
6.2.8 GSK is Set to Improve Medical Imaging
6.3 Hoffmann-La Roche
6.3.1 Roche Builds Center of Excellence for RNAi Therapeutics Discovery
6.3.2 A New Delivery Route for Avastin?
6.3.3 Improving Antibody Drugs
6.3.4 Roche Strengthens Presence in Genomics Research Market
6.3.5 Target Validation
6.3.6 Drug Discovery Collaborations
6.3.7 Marketing
6.3.8 Outlicensing
6.3.9 Size Doesn’t Matter: Genentech’s Goal of Aggressively Pursuing Novel and Innovative Therapies
6.4 Novartis
6.4.1 Novartis Acquisition of Chiron: A Major Biopharmaceutical Investment
6.4.2 Protein Kinase Inhibitors
6.4.3 Next Generation Oral Topoisomerase Inhibitor and Telomerase Promotors
6.4.4 Novartis Sells of World-Wide Rights
6.4.5 Biomarker and Proteomics Research
6.5 Sanofi-Aventis
6.5.1 Target Screening and Validation
6.5.2 Biologicals
6.5.3 A Short Cut to Success?
6.5.4 Aventis Divests Interest
6.5.5 Recombine My Molecule
7 Competitive R&D Comparison on Oncology Drug Target Level
7.1 Target Overview
7.2 Head to Head Target Comparison by Molecular Function and Cancer Type
7.2.1 Transmembrane Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Activity Targets
7.2.2 Receptor Activity Targets
7.2.3 G-protein Coupled Receptor Activity Targets
7.2.4 Protein Serine/Threonine Kinase Activity Targets
7.2.5 Transcription Factor Activity Targets
7.2.6 Transmembrane Receptor Activity Targets
7.2.7 Catalytic Activity Targets
7.2.8 Cytokine Activity Targets
7.2.9 Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Activity Targets
7.2.10 Kinase Activity Targets
7.2.11 DNA Topoisomerase Activity Targets
7.2.12 Growth Factor Activity Targets
7.2.13 Ligase Activity Targets
7.2.14 Motor Activity Targets
7.2.15 Structural Constituent of Cytoskeleton Targets
7.2.16 Transporter Activity Targets
7.2.17 Targets According to Miscellaneous Molecular Function Groups
7.2.18 Unclassified or Unknown Molecular Function of Targets
7.3 Drug Targets by Target Localization and Compound Type
7.4 Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to Signaling Pathways
7.4.1 Alpha6 Beta4 Integrin Signaling Pathway
7.4.2 Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway
7.4.3 B Cell Receptor Signaling Pathway
7.4.4 EGFR1 Signaling Pathway
7.4.5 Hedgehog Signaling Pathwa
7.4.6 ID Signaling Pathway
7.4.7 IL-1 Signaling Pathway
7.4.8 IL-2 Signaling Pathway
7.4.9 IL-3 Signaling Pathway
7.4.10 IL-4 Signaling Pathway
7.4.11 IL-5 Signaling Pathway
7.4.12 IL-6 Signaling Pathway
7.4.13 IL-9 Signaling Pathway
7.4.14 Kit Receptor Signaling Pathway
7.4.15 Notch Signaling Pathway
7.4.16 T Cell Receptor Signaling Pathway
7.4.17 TGF-beta Receptor Signaling Pathway
7.4.18 TNF-alpha Signaling Pathway
7.4.19 Wnt Signaling Pathway
8 Drug Compound Type Analysis
8.1 Deployment of Biological Based Compounds by Cancer Indications
8.2 Deployment of Chemical Based Compounds by Cancer Indications
8.3 Deployment of Natural Product Compounds by Cancer Indications
9 Drug Development in Oncology by Major Targeted Therapy Areas
9.1 Angiogenesis
9.2 Antibodies
9.3 Apoptosis
9.4 Protein Kinase Inhibitors
9.5 Vaccines
10 Cancer Indication Focus Analysis
10.1 Preclinical Stage Pipeline
10.2 Phase I Clinical Stage Pipeline
10.3 Phase II Clinical Stage Pipeline
10.4 Phase III Clinical Stage Pipeline
10.5 Drugs Soon to be on the Market
10.6 Approved Drugs
11 Disclaimer
12 Drug Index
13 Company Index


4.1 List of Tables
Table 1: How to Navigate the Report
Table 2: Number of Pursued Oncology Drugs Targets by Company
Table 3: Pursued Oncology Drugs Targets by Molecular Function
Table 4: Drug Target Expression Profiles in Humans
Table 5: Identified Targets By Cancer Indications
Table 6: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Transmembrane Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Activity Targets
Table 7: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Receptor Activity Targets
Table 8: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with G-protein Coupled Receptor Activity
Table 9: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Protein Serine/Threonine Kinase Activity
Table 10: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Transcription Factor Activity Targets
Table 11: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Transmembrane Receptor Activity Targets
Table 12: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Catalytic Activity Targets
Table 13: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Cytokine Activity Targets
Table 14: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Activity Targets
Table 15: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Kinase Activity Targets
Table 16: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with DNA Topoisomerase Activity Targets
Table 17: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Growth Factor Activity Targets
Table 18: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Ligase Activity Targets
Table 19: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Motor Activity Targets
Table 20: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Structural Constituent of Cytoskeleton Targets
Table 21: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Transporter Activity Targets
Table 22: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Targets According to Miscellaneous Molecular Function Groups
Table 23: Head to Head Comparison of Drugs with Unclassified or Unknown Molecular Function Targets
Table 24: Drug Target Comparison by Target Localization and Compound Type
Table 25: Targeting Signaling Pathways: An Overview
Table 26: Targeted Signaling Pathway Profiles of Big Pharma
Table 27: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Alpha6 Beta4 Integrin Signaling Pathway
Table 28: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway
Table 29: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the B Cell Receptor Signaling Pathway
Table 30: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the EGFR1 Signaling Pathway
Table 31: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway
Table 32: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the ID Signaling Pathway
Table 33: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the IL-1 Signaling Pathway
Table 34: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the IL-3 Signaling Pathway
Table 35: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the IL-4 Signaling Pathway
Table 36: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the IL-5 Signaling Pathway
Table 37: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the IL-6 Signaling Pathway
Table 38: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Kit Receptor Signaling Pathway
Table 39: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Notch Signaling Pathway
Table 40: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the T Cell Receptor Signaling Pathway
Table 41: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the TGF-beta Receptor Signaling Pathway
Table 42: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the TNF-alpha Signaling Pathway
Table 43: Targets, Drugs and Cancer Indications Linked to the Wnt Signaling Pathway
Table 44: Deployment of Biological Based Compounds by Cancer Indications
Table 45: Deployment of Chemical Based Compounds by Cancer Indications
Table 46: Deployment of Natural Product Based Compounds by Cancer Indications
Table 47: Comparative Presentation of Targeted Therapy Areas in Oncology
Table 48: The Angiogenesis Pipeline by Cancer Type and Developmental Stage
Table 49: The Antibody Pipeline by Cancer Type and Developmental Stage
Table 50: The Apoptosis Pipeline by Cancer Type and Developmental Stage
Table 51: The Protein Kinase Inhibitor Pipeline by Cancer Type and Developmental Stage
Table 52: The Cancer Vaccine Pipeline by Cancer Type and Developmental Stage
Table 53: Summary of Big Pharma’s Preclinical Stage Pipeline
Table 54: Preclinical Stage Pipeline by Cancer Indications
Table 55: Summary of Big Pharma’s Phase I Clinical Stage Pipeline
Table 56: : Phase I Clinical Stage Pipeline by Cancer Indications
Table 57: Summary of Big Pharma’s Phase II Clinical Stage Pipeline
Table 58: Phase II Clinical Stage Pipeline by Cancer Indications
Table 59: Summary of Big Pharma’s Phase III Clinical Stage Pipeline
Table 60: Phase III Clinical Stage Pipeline by Cancer Indications
Table 61: Oncology Drugs Soon to be on the Market
Table 62: Summary of Big Pharma’s Approved Oncology Drugs
Table 63: Approved Drugs by Cancer Indications

Request Sample Pages or Access via 1stOncology™

  • You can request Free Sample Pages to Decoding Big Pharmas R&D Strategy in Oncology.
    To find out more about Decoding Big Pharmas R&D Strategy in Oncology, please read the product description below.
    We also are happy to email you out free sample pages which contain screen shots and more information on the methodology behind the product.

    Did you know that Decoding Big Pharmas R&D Strategy in Oncology is part of the 1stOncology™ platform and can be accessed at no extra cost?

    1stOncology™ allows you to always stay on top of what is really going on in the world of cancer drug development and have an edge when it comes to Search & Evaluation, Indication Selection & Expansion, Target Scouting, First-in-Class analysis and much, much more.


    Or

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